Events

HtHS 'Give it a go' session

HtHS 'Give it a go' session

NeuroTriage are pleased to have been able to support the University of Liverpool’s ‘Help the Homeless Society’ (HtHS) with their recent ‘Give it a go’ session.

The HtHS run these events annually in order to encourage interest from the student community, in raising awareness of homelessness and providing support where possible. The HtHS committee are a brilliant bunch of people, who care deeply about addressing inequalities. Much of what they do is done without fuss, but makes a huge difference to those they help. As one of the biggest Societies in the university, they take their responsibilities very seriously whilst finding innovative ways to keep evolving what they do and how they do it.

This year’s event featured a video message from Louise Ellman (Labour MP for Liverpool Riverside) which you can watch above. Louise had wanted to attend the event but had to be in Westminster. Receiving a message such as this from an MP showed the students form the outset that their work is valued, that MPs are listening, and that there is a strength in unity when trying to affect change. Much change is needed too, as demonstrated from our very own Jacq A. who spoke about their own experience of needing to escape but then becoming a target when homeless. As Jacq pointed out, not all homeless people are white men, despite what media images may have us believe. Some people make themselves as hidden as possible when rough, and they are often missed from statistics, services, and needs appraisals. We must do better here. The event explored personal experiences, professional perspectives and research being conducted in Liverpool, before concluding with a workshop led by Andy Greene, a disability activist who encouraged us to think plan how we want to affect change, what resources we need to do it, and how we can work together to access those resources.

I think we all came away from the night determined to hold the stories we hear with us, and use them as motivation to make sure we take action and make real change, with rather than on behalf of people with experience of homelessness.

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